What does family-friendly homework look like?

Elementary aged child sleeping at desk with book over head and holding written sign that says Help

The following content is adapted from an article from Salon.com which can be read here.

“There is no evidence that any amount of homework improves the academic performance of elementary students.” This statement, by homework research guru Harris Cooper, of Duke University, is startling to hear, no matter which side of the homework debate you’re on. When you look at the facts, however, here’s what you find: Homework has benefits, but its benefits are age-dependent.

We know there are many ways that schools and community partners can support learning at home — but maybe there needs to be a shift away from the expectation that learning at home has to look just like learning at school. So, what COULD it look like to support learning at home?

“The key is to make sure it’s joyous. If a child doesn’t want to practice her reading skills after a long school day, let her listen instead. Any other projects that come home should be optional and occasional. If the assignment does not promote greater love of school and interest in learning, then it has no place in an elementary school-aged child’s day.”

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Ohio Parents and Caregivers -- Click Here to Apply to be on our Advisory Council in 2021 -- Applications Due November 26, 2020

We are now recruiting Ohio parents and caregivers of Ohio children from birth to grade 12 to be members of our advisory council beginning in January 2021!

Click here to download the English version of the application and share with families in your community.

Click here to download the Spanish version of the application and share with families in your community.

Applications are due by November 26, 2020, and can be emailed as an attachment to OhioSFEC@osu.edu.

To read more about the work of the council, visit our state advisory council web page.

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